Categories
Healthy Home Mold

Mold That Cross Contaminates: A Growing Problem

Mold That Cross Contaminates: A Growing Problem

Unhealthy indoor mold spores are microscopic, and when disturbed, travel quickly and easily through the air, landing wherever the current takes them. That’s the problem with indoor mold. First, mold spores form colonies and grow quickly. Second, they spread easily and can cross contaminate “clean” spaces if not properly handled. Once mold spores spread, your problems grow – literally.

How Does Cross Contamination Occur?

Cross contamination occurs in a variety of ways:

HVAC Units

  • mold cross contaminationMold spores are microscopic, so HVAC units can easily spread clusters of spores through ductwork. Mold spores in a basement can be propelled through HVAC ducts and contaminate clean spaces, even on another floor!

Improper remediation

  • There are terrific remediation companies that do great work. And, there are some remediation companies that don’t properly train their employees, leading to sloppiness and carelessness. If your contractor did not properly contain areas where mold was being removed, they may have inadvertently released the spores into the air and contaminated other parts of your living space. Less-than-reputable contractors may look to take advantage of homeowners who want to quickly fix a mold concern following a major storm or hurricane.

Forgetting to remove contaminated clothing

  • mold contamination Mold spores are frequent travelers. Spores can adhere to your shoes or clothing, which can carry them from one room to another. It’s important to remove shoes and clothing and clean them after you’ve been in an area that is contaminated by mold.

Moving contaminated objects around

  • Moving objects and contents from a contaminated area to other parts of your home or office can also pose a threat of cross contamination. Ask an expert like RTK before removing items from a room where you can see mold. It’s a simple question that could save you thousands in additional remediation.

How Will I Know If I Have Mold Cross Contamination?

mold inspectionThe only way to know if mold has spread to other areas of your home or office is to have it tested by an independent mold testing company like RTK. A complete mold inspection involves testing in other areas where mold may not be visible. Our trained and licensed inspectors take air samples in multiple rooms to pinpoint all the mold contamination. A few extra samples at the beginning can save you a lot of money later in cleanup costs, protect your health, and document which rooms were and were not contaminated before remediation.

What Can I Do to Avoid Cross Contamination?

The first thing to do is to check for mold. During a mold inspection, additional mold samples may be taken to assess potential cross contamination into other areas of the property. Once you know where the mold problem is, it can be properly contained and removed.

An independent testing company will identify contaminated areas and provide a “blueprint” for remediation. Then, make sure you are working with an experienced, professional mold remediation company who will follow proper procedures to remove mold contamination without the risk of cross contamination.

Remember, a reputable company will only remediate and will not test for mold because that is a clear conflict of interest (and illegal in New York State). Here’s what a reputable remediation company will do:

  • proper mold remediationWear proper safety gear
  • Seal off the work area using plastic sheeting so that mold spores do not become dispersed throughout the home
  • Use HEPA vacuums, HEPA air scrubbers, air exchange and commercial-strength dehumidifiers to ensure the air is properly cleaned of airborne mold spores once the physical removal of mold is complete
  • Use an antimicrobial chemical to clean any remaining mold after remediation
  • Apply a sealer or encapsulant to make the treated areas more resistant to water damage and mold, and to minimize possible odors

Once mold remediation is complete, have a clearance test performed to ensure work was done properly and ensure that cross contamination has not occurred.

If you have a mold problem, take action to prevent cross contamination. Speak with your RTK mold inspector about your situation; the inspector will be able to assess potential hazards and keep your mold problem to a minimum.

 

Categories
Flooding & Water Damage Mold

Quick Guide to Clean Up a Flooded Basement

Quick Guide to Clean Up a Flooded Basement

More heavy rain is causing problems for home and business owners throughout the Tri-State area. Flooded basements are everywhere.

With the torrential rains, flooding is rampant because the ground cannot handle the volume of water due to a high water table. The pools of water in your yard and close to your home’s foundation could indicate that water may be seeping into your basement. Once your basement gets wet, it becomes a prime area for mold growth, which can emerge within 24 – 48 hours, and even spread throughout your home.

Mold causes serious health issues, including asthma, allergies, headaches, fatigue, and coughing. Exposure to toxic black mold causes more severe health consequences, including chronic bronchitis, heart problems, learning disabilities, mental deficiencies, and multiple sclerosis. Here are steps you can take to prevent mold growth.

Top 4 tips to prevent mold growth in your flooded basement:

1. Make sure the drain in your basement floor is free from debris and the sump pump is working.

This will help the water drain properly. Also, make sure your sump pump is working, if you have one. Sometimes after the power goes out, your sump pump may need to be reset before it kicks on.

2. Remove anything from the floor that is wet.

Boxes, toys, carpeting, and any other cellulose materials are very susceptible to mold growth. Get them out of the water and to an area that they can dry out in. If they can’t be dried within 24 hours, they may become infested with mold and need to be discarded.

3. Pump or vacuum the water from the area quickly.

You can also mop it out. Remember, the soil outside is already saturated, so be careful not to pump out the area too fast. The water still has nowhere to go, and the pressure of the water on the outside of your home could damage your basement wall, or even collapse it.

4. Use fans, a dehumidifier, and ventilate the area well.

 

After the flooding has stopped and the bulk of the water has been removed, you need to dry the rest of the area with fans, including concrete floors, drywall, wood, and more. Then, use a dehumidifier, set to no higher than 50%, to combat residual moisture, which causes higher humidity, and provides an idea environment for mold to grow. Mold in your home can cause health issues and make asthma symptoms worse.

If you are unable to take these steps quickly or are unsure as to whether you already have a mold problem, the best thing to do for the health of your family and your home is to call in a professional, like RTK, to conduct a mold test.

Categories
Healthy Home Asbestos Dust Lead Mold

Brand New Life: How to Remodel Your Old House

Brand New Life: How to Remodel Your Old House

By Jennifer Monroe

Breathing fresh air into your old house can sometimes be accomplished simply with a fresh coat of paint, but at others, it requires a remodel. At some point, every house requires a remodel, no matter how much TLC it was given over the years. The difficulty is knowing where and how to begin the process. There are so many different options for changing aspects of your old house, so it largely depends on what you want out of the remodel. In this article, there will be five tips to get you started on the process of remodeling your old house.

Plan it All Out

remodeling adviceBefore beginning your remodel, it is best to plan out what you want to be done and how you want the final product to look. This is because when you begin, you can get bogged down and lose sight of what you actually want, and change your mind halfway through. It is also advisable to consider why you are doing the remodel, if it is for you then you can really change it to suit all of your needs, however, if it is for an investment then it is better to look into popular trends before starting your project.

Have a Budget

remodeling budgetDeciding how much money you have available to you for the remodel will definitely influence what you want to be done and how you’ll do it. Knowing your budget before you start is one of the best things you can do, otherwise, you could end up spending a lot more than you have available to you. Your budget will determine how much you can do, whether you will need to do the remodel in stages, and what materials you will have at your disposal.

Test for Hazardous Materials

When remodeling an older home, toxins will be lurking where you least expect them. Before you start tearing into walls and removing flooring or tiles, have your home tested for asbestos and lead, both dangerous health hazards. If you unknowingly disturb these materials during the remodel process, you could also be looking at a hefty price tag for the clean-up. Lead causes permanent cognitive damage, violent behavior, autism-like symptoms, loss of IQ and more. Asbestos causes lung-related disease like mesothelioma. Best to have a blueprint of where hazardous materials are so you can take proper precautions.

Do Your Research

When planning to remodel your home it is important that you delve into research; ask those around you who you trust and have done something like this previously for advice and look at the prices and different styles that could potentially be what you want your house to look like at the end. By researching there is a higher chance that you won’t have the wool pulled over your eyes and will feel more confident in your choices. It also helps in the sense that you will have others to tell you what will work and what won’t before it is built instead of going ahead with your vision then realizing it doesn’t have the impact you would want it to.

Think About What Needs to Stay

renovation adviceWhen remodeling your home, it is wise to investigate what can’t be moved from where it currently is. This is particularly true for things like a load-bearing wall because you will be unable to knock this down even if it is the main thing that you want to accomplish. It is also good to keep your small devices so you don’t have to spend extra money on buying new ones. Sometimes there will be ways around it, which is another way your research will come in handy, but otherwise, some things won’t be able to be adapted as you may want them to, so you’ll need to work the remodeling around this.

Contact a Professional

If you want something done in a specific way, or you feel that a job is beyond your skill set, it is best to call in a general contractor. Contacting a professional early on in the process can be handy as well because they can advise you of any pitfalls that may occur in both the planning and building stages. This is where doing research by talking to others who have already been there can come in handy, as they will either have recommendations or be able to tell you who to avoid, which is important as you will need to be able to trust the people who will be spending that much time in your home.

Final Thoughts

So, before you even begin any work, it is important that you look into the different points above. There is no reason that you won’t be able to accomplish the plans you want, but you need to be aware of all the work that is needed in the process of remodeling so that you aren’t caught off guard by anything.

Categories
Healthy Home Asbestos Dust Flooding & Water Damage Lead Mold

Environmental Issues: Is Your Home Trying to Tell You Something?

Is Your Home Trying to Tell You Something?

environmental home issues

We are attuned to listening to the steady messages of our loved ones, our coworkers, and even our bodies. The question is, do you pay attention to the subtle signs your home may be telling you about an issue? Probably not. Often, many unhealthy environmental toxins in the home come with warning signs – you just have to know what they are.

Here are the Top 5 Signs of a Potential Environmental Issue:

  1. Musty Odor

musty odor moldIf you smell something afoul, don’t ignore it. A musty odor may indicate a mold or mildew problem, which can cause serious health issues. In addition to allergy like symptoms, trouble breathing, and rashes, mold can also cause headaches, fatigue and dizziness.

If you catch a whiff of that musty odor, you should schedule a mold test. An independent mold test (from a company that does not also remediate) can help you to find hidden mold and pinpoint the problem. This will enable you to hire a reputable contractor to remove the mold precisely, and save you thousands of dollars on unnecessary repairs.

  1. Chipping Paint & Dust Window Panes

leaded window

If you see dust around your window sills or chipping paint in your home that was built before 1978 (the year lead paint was banned), it should be a red flag. Chipping lead paint is a big source of lead poisoning, which is extremely dangerous, especially for children, older adults, and pets. Lead poisoning can cause a serious host of issues including neurological and cognitive deficits, autism-like symptoms, mood swings, and even violent behavior.

The most common cause of lead poisoning is lead dust, which is created every time you open or close a lead painted window, or through improper renovations. Lead dust can spread throughout a home and even into the soil surrounding your home. Unfortunately, most of the time you cannot see lead particles in dust or soil, so unless you test for it, you may not even know that this hazard exists.

  1. Smelly or Discolored Water

polluted waterIf your water is not running clear or smells funny, you likely have a problem, either with your well or older pipes. Bacteria, heavy metals, and other contaminants can cause your water to be less than fresh, and sometimes dangerous.

You may mistakenly believe that because drinking water comes from a well, it’s pure and safer than water from reservoirs or city supplies. However, well water can contain a host of contaminants, including coliform bacteria, uranium, lead, arsenic, E. coli, nitrates, VOCs (volatile organic compounds) radon, pesticides, and MtBE (a gasoline compound), which can cause a wide variety of health problems, including skin problems; damage to the brain, kidneys, and neurological system; gastro-intestinal illness; hair loss; and immune deficiencies.

If you have town or city water and you still notice something off, it may be your pipes. Older pipes can leach lead or other heavy metals into your water supply, causing discoloration, odors, and even a fine grit. If something is off with your water, have it tested. Most of these issues are easily fixed.

  1. Leaky Roof

leaky roof moldIf you go running for a bucket and towels every time it rains, your problem is likely larger than a leaky roof. When water intrusion occurs, like a leaky roof, mold can grow within 24 – 48 hours. And, if you let it go, it can literally grow. And grow. And grow. Mold colonies can be hidden under roof tiles, behind ceilings, sheetrock, and inside walls. And every time it rains, spores will grow larger. If that’s the case, by not addressing the issue, you could be causing structural damage, not to mention the many adverse health effects mentioned earlier.

  1. Chemical Smells

vocOften, that “new car smell” is caused by off-gassing from volatile organic compounds, or VOCs. VOCs are toxic vapors that are off-gassed from man-made materials and everyday household (and workplace) items. VOCs cause poor indoor air quality, which can cause headaches, dizziness, listlessness, depression, and much more. Common causes of poor IAQ are cleaners and disinfectants, new furniture or carpeting, candles, electronics, and paints. If your indoor air isn’t quite right, or if you are experiencing unexplained symptoms, have an indoor air quality test. This can pinpoint or rule out mold and VOCs, and help you breathe easier.

If you suspect that your home is trying to tell you something, please don’t wait. Your health, and that of everyone in your home, may be at risk. Call RTK today to schedule an environmental inspection at 800.392.6468.

 

 

 

 

 

Categories
Flooding & Water Damage Mold Mold Testing

4 Signs of Mold in Your Home

4 Signs of Mold in Your Home

Mold is out in full force. Humidity has been high, and storms have dumped drenching rains, causing major flooding (both indoors and outdoors). Plus, high winds and power outages may have caused leaks, sump pump failures, flooded basements, and other issues. These are some of the contributing factors to mold growth and poor indoor air quality. Problem is, we often don’t realize the extent of the damage until days or weeks after the storm or event, and a musty order usually signals the problem. That’s when you know that mold growth has really kicked in. Mold should be taken seriously, as it can cause structural damage, poor indoor air quality, and health issues.

Look for these 4 signs of mold in your home.

1. Visible Mold

new york mold testingIf you see mold, then you clearly have a mold issue. If you see water stains, you probably have a mold issue as well. The question then becomes how big is the problem? Because mold is often hidden, growing on the back sides of walls and sheetrock, and under carpets and floorboards, the only way to be sure is to have a mold inspection performed by a certified professional.

2. Musty Odor

Musty odors usually point to mold, and mold causes poor indoor air quality. RTK can test to see where the odor is coming from so that you can remediate with confidence, and don’t miss any hidden sources or spots. Summer months are particularly prone to mold growth as high humidity and heat accelerate the proliferation of this fungus.

3. Unexplained Health Symptoms 

how to tell if you have moldIf you are having physical symptoms such as itchy eyes, cough or wheezing that occur in one location of the premises that clear up when you are elsewhere, it’s a sure bet that the location is harboring mold. If you have any of the following unexplained symptoms, they may be caused by MOLD EXPOSURE and poor indoor air quality. In that case, you should have a mold and indoor air quality test.

  • Sneezing
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Itchy eyes, nose and throat
  • Cough and postnasal drip
  • Watery eyes
  • Wheezing
  • Rash

4. Structural Damage

If a storm caused a leak from your foundation, walls, or your roof into your basement, mold is sure to follow. A mold colony can grow within 24 – 48 hours. So, it’s important to test for mold, because when the next storm hits the structural issue that allowed water intrusion will likely occur again if it is not repaired. Mold tends to hide behind walls and under floors, so you may not see the problem. But left unchecked, mold can eat away at wood structure, floorboards, and sheetrock, leaving them susceptible to decay.

Tip: Avoid Mold Removal Scams

Never hire a company that does both mold testing and mold remediation. Why? It is a clear conflict of interest. Often, unscrupulous companies will embellish a mold problem or offer testing on the cheap in hopes of making money on the remediation to follow. But at RTK, we only test for mold and do not remediate, so there is no conflict of interest. Once we have tested your premises, we provide you with a blueprint for mold removal, and you can hire the remediation company of your choice.

If you had flooding or a water intrusion from a storm and think you may have mold, call and schedule a test today at 800.392.6468.

 

Categories
Healthy Home Mold

Tips to Fight Household Mold this Summer

Tips to Fight Household Mold this Summer

It’s mold weather. Hmm? Yes, mold weather. The combination of heat, high humidity, and thunderstorms will invite mold to rear its ugly head. It may seem innocent, but it can cause major damage to your health and home. Here’s why you need to pay attention to mold:

Mold causes health problems.

All mold—whether it is toxic or not — causes health issues, including allergic reactions, sneezing, runny, itchy eyes, red nose, and skin rashes. Mold can also cause asthma attacks and can irritate the eyes, skin, nose, throat, and lungs.

Mold damages homes.mold-damages-homes

Mold can destroy the things it grows on – including your home’s walls, floors, carpeting, and furnishings. Often times, mold grows behind drywall, under carpets, and under floorboards. This is dangerous because by the time you find out it’s there; you usually have a major problem. In extreme cases, mold can grow to the extent that the home cannot be remediated, and needs to be knocked down. The key is to control moisture in your home and eliminate mold growth before it takes over.

TIP: Keep your humidifier set at 50% or below during humid summer months.

Don’t wait – take immediate steps to prevent mold, especially after heavy rain.

The most important thing you can do is to control moisture levels in your home. If water mold-testing-marylandenters your home, take immediate steps to get rid of it. Remove anything that gets wet. Use vacuums and fans to rid surfaces of any residual moisture.

TIP: Take action within 24 hours, as mold can invade your home in less than a day.

Another preventative measure is managing the water runoff from your house. If the water pouring off your roof has nowhere to drain, it can and will find its way into your home. Keep your gutters and downspouts debris-free. Also, make sure that your downspouts are adequately angled away from the house. Otherwise, water will collect at the edge of the house and leak into the foundation and basement.

Test for mold if water enters your house.

indoor moldOnce an area is dry, test for mold, especially if you smell a musty odor. Since do-it-yourself mold tests are often inaccurate, your best bet is to call in an independent, certified microbial mold inspector.

Don’t get scammed!

Make sure the company you hire to test does not also do remediation. An independent, free-mold-testing-scamcertified testing-only service has no incentive to magnify the problem and increase profits through remediation services. They won’t bait you with “free testing”, and have nothing to gain financially by inventing problems in your home or business, therefore can potentially save you thousands on unnecessary repairs. Click here for more information.

The Environmental Protection Agency offers a free download, Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture and Your Home. Check it out HERE.

Categories
Flooding & Water Damage Mold

Help! Black Mold is Creeping Up My Walls!

What Can You Do If You Have Black Mold Creeping Up Your Walls?

Q. I have black mold growing up the walls in my basement. Can I remove mold myself? – Nancy K., White Plains, NY

A. First, it’s important to keep in mind that mold — in any form — can be harmful to your health.

So all of your mold must be removed. There lies the problem: The mold growing on your walls is easy to see, but most of the mold growing in homes is hidden. The only way to pinpoint where it is lurking is with mold testing. (In our next blog post, we will discuss do-it-yourself mold testing kits vs. professional mold testing.) So yes, may be able to remove visible mold, but without professional testing, you won’t know how serious the problem really is.

You failed to mention whether your basement walls are cement or Sheetrock. If the mold is on Sheetrock, it is impossible to remove it. The moldy areas must be cut out, removed, and the walls must be replaced. And, if the moldy area is more than about 10 square feet (less than roughly a 3 ft. by 3 ft. patch), the EPA recommends professional mold remediation.

What you will need to assess and clean mold:

  • First, schedule a professional mold test to assess the situation. This will give you a blueprint of where the mold is, and whether you will be able to clean it yourself;
  • A mask or respirator to filter out the mold spores you’ll be disturbing;
  • Eye protection;
  • Rubber gloves;
  • Rags and a scrub brush;
  • Non-ammonia soap or detergent;
  • Large pail;
  • Bleach;
  • Fan and/or dehumidifier;
  • Work clothes, either old or white, since you will be using bleach;
  • Plastic garbage bag;
  • White vinegar.

Before removing black mold from a cement wall, dampen the moldy area well with a rag and plain water. This will keep the mold spores from disbursing through the air. Then scrub the area thoroughly with a scrub brush and non-ammonia soap or detergent to remove as much of the mold as possible.

Next comes the all-important bleach wash, which will remove any leftover mold, in addition to stopping future mold growth. In a pail, add 1½ cups bleach to 1 gallon of water. Wet the surface well with this mixture, letting it soak in for about 15 minutes. Scrub the area with the scrub brush. Then rinse well with clean, clear water. Repeat these two steps until all visible mold is gone. Next, use a fan and/or dehumidifier to dry the area well. If you leave any moisture behind, you are leaving your wall open to mold growth.

And finally, remove your work clothes in the basement, place them in a plastic bag, and head to your washing machine. The clothes will be coated with mold spores, and the last thing you want to do is track those spores throughout your house. Add ¾ cup white vinegar to your wash water to kill the mold on your clothes.

If you suspect you have mold in your home, call RTK Environmental Group at 800.392.6468 for information about mold testing or to schedule a test of your home.

Categories
Indoor Air Quality & Radon Mold

Post-COVID, How to Prepare Your Office for A Healthy Return to Work

Post-COVID, How to Prepare Your Office for A Healthy Return to Work

 

office reopeningMany employers are preparing to reopen their offices after employees have been working remotely for the past 15 +/- months. In addition to preparing for new cleaning, health, and safety protocols and updating policies and work-from-home procedures, you should stop for a moment and consider the environmental state of the office you will be returning to.

 

With offices largely unused for long periods of time, there may have been little or no good air circulation. If so, the office may be harboring mold and poor indoor air quality.

 

HVAC mold“We’re seeing offices, schools, and other facilities with significant mold issues says Robert Weitz, principal of RTK Environmental. “In cases where companies turned off air conditioning or increased the indoor temperature, stagnant air and humidity may have begun to create major mold problems.” Weitz said in those cases, the cleanup might come with a hefty price tag.  “Most offices will not have such significant damage, but you should still take precautions for your own health and safety as well as that of your employees,” he says.

 

Mold in Offices

 

mold under sinkMold is a serious health hazard that should not be taken lightly. Mold causes breathing difficulties, allergies, fatigue, rashes, lower productivity, and more. With offices being shut for many months, moist conditions might have contributed to the growth of mold colonies in refrigerators, carpeting, HVAC systems, and may be widespread behind walls. Before you return to the office, it pays to have a mold test.

 

Indoor Air Quality in Offices

poor office air qualityPoor indoor air quality is caused by mold, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), dust, and other contaminants. It can cause headaches, fatigue and listlessness, dizziness, nausea, nervousness, and difficulty concentrating, among other issues. And, if you have new office equipment, carpeting, flooring, or furniture, you may have elevated VOCs, as these materials tend to off-gas toxins.

 

Here are some important areas to check:

HVAC Systems

HVAC IAQWhether you turned off your HVAC system or not, you should at the get go change the filters, as dust and debris are likely to have taken up residence there. Worse, the HVAC system may be harboring mold. During summer months, condensation, which can cause mold growth, often occurs in HVAC units and associated ducting. Once the heat is turned on, microscopic mold spores can easily spread through ductwork. The spores can contaminate clean spaces anywhere in the building. The safest bet is to test your indoor air.

Refrigerators

Many people are returning to work to find mold growing in their refrigerators. This can usually be cleaned with bleach or an anti-fungal product. You may also spot water stains on the carpeting, meaning that the refrigerator leaked during the closure. If that is the case, you may have a mold problem that goes deeper than the fridge.

Carpets and Ceilings

If you notice water staining on ceilings or carpets, there was likely significant water intrusion. Burst pipes and leaks may have gone unnoticed. Mold may be growing in places you cannot see. But you won’t know that unless you test.

Computers and Office Equipment

VOC office equipmentDust and debris are likely everywhere on your computers, keyboards, copiers, and other office machines. Be sure to dust and vacuum your equipment thoroughly so that you don’t release any extra irritants into the air once the machines are back in use.

Under Sinks

Check for water staining under sinks, as there may have been a leak in the pipes, which would cause mold growth.

 

Before you reopen the office, have a mold and indoor air quality test. Not only does it show your employees that you care and are taking safety guidelines seriously, but it will protect the health of your employees, leading to a more productive workforce. Call us at 800.392.6468 to schedule a test.

Categories
Healthy Home Mold

What Should I Do If My Summer House Has Mold?

What Should I Do If My Summer House Has Mold?

So, you’re heading to the beach as summer season begins. The thought is delicious! But don’t be surprised if you’re greeted by a musty odor after you walk into what you had hoped would be your home away from home. Mildew! Mold! Whether you are at the Jersey Shore or the Hamptons, there’s an excellent chance that the home you’re renting or own has been flooded during a hurricane, been exposed to excess moisture and humidity, or has had a leak. Now, your nose is getting a strong whiff of the result. So what can you do?

“The first thing to do is open the windows and get air to circulate,” advises Robert Weitz, Certified Microbial Investigator and principal of RTK Environmental Group. Weitz says this is a common problem, as many vacation homes sit empty and closed up over the winter months, collecting moisture, especially since air conditioning or heat has been turned off for the season. “Mold is not picky – it only needs moisture and a food source, such as wood, ceiling tiles, carpet or sheet rock, to begin growing. The house next door may be fine, and yours may be a serious health hazard.” The important thing is to have your home tested right away so the problem can be fixed,  your health is not compromised, and your summer is not ruined.

Whether you hire a mold inspector or put up with it will probably depend on whether you are the owner or renter, how long you will be there, and whether you or your vacationers have allergy or breathing issues.

Short-Term Solutions to Summer House Mold:

–      Keep the windows open as much as possible if the weather is dry;

–      Use a dehumidifier to reduce moisture;

–      Change the filter in the air conditioner before you turn it on;

–      Wipe off any visible mold on walls, floors and tiles with a bleach/water mixture;

–      Use allergy medication to help lessen symptoms;

–      Let the landlord know there’s a mold problem.

The Best Solution:

–      Get an independent mold inspection to identify the source;

–      Ask that the inspector pinpoint if the mold is toxic or not;

–      Have the mold properly remediated.

Remember, if you own the house or plan to be there for an extended stay, mold could affect your health, causing wheezing, asthma, and allergy symptoms. The home should be tested by a certified microbial investigator, who can then advise you as to the next steps depending on the outcome of the mold testing. In New York, it is illegal for the same company to test and remediate on the same job. Whatever the case, mold can become a big issue quickly, so don’t ignore it!

 

Categories
Indoor Air Quality & Radon Mold

Poor Indoor Air Quality May Be Rampant in Gyms & Fitness Centers

Air Quality in Gyms: Poor Indoor Air May Be Rampant in Fitness Centers

Most people patronize gyms and fitness centers to improve their health and wellness, or so they think. But not all these facilities are as “healthy” as they could be. In fact, some actually have poor indoor air quality (IAQ) – a concern, especially since gyms and fitness centers are now reopening as the pandemic wanes.

gyms vocs

First, all that huffing and puffing actually impacts IAQ. According to a study released in 2021 by the University of Colorado Boulder [1], one sweaty, huffing, exercising person emits as many chemicals from their body as up to five sedentary people. Those human emissions, including acetone from breath and amino acids from sweat, chemically combine with disinfectants and bleach cleaners to form new airborne chemicals that negatively impact indoor air quality. You’re more likely to inhale the toxins while exercising because you are breathing more heavily and at a faster pace.

gym air qualityThen, there’s the building itself. At a recently constructed or renovated facility, testing often finds much higher levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) due to the off-gassing from new building materials and gym equipment. Included in that list would be new furniture, carpeting, adhesives, composite wood products like cabinets and lockers, work-out machines, and vinyl, such as mats, shower curtains or tile. The quality of ventilation also comes into play. Often, high levels of VOCs, formaldehyde, CO2, and particulate matter accumulate because of inadequate ventilation.

Exposure Issues

voc air qualityWhere you live also impacts IAQ. The CDC, EPA, and several medical journals point out that exposure to air pollutants in urban areas is linked to higher rates of asthma and abnormal heart rhythms, and increases the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, respiratory diseases, and all other natural causes. [[3],[4],[5]] That said, poor indoor air quality can be present in any indoor environment, with VOCs and mold being the primary causes.

Exposure to VOCs in high levels can cause skin irritation, neurotoxic, and hepatotoxic (toxicity of the liver) effects, and certain of them are carcinogenic.[6] They also make you tired, cranky, and unfocused. The studies found that the concentrations of these substances generally exceeded most accepted standards for indoor air quality. However, no government agency in the United States formally monitors air quality in gyms.

Mold in Gyms

sauna moldYou probably know that feeling when you walk into a gym – it’s humid, damp, and smells sweaty. It’s no surprise, then, that many gyms contain elevated levels of mold, with the steamy sauna, swimming pool area, and shower areas that are in use all day long.

Mold is a health hazard. Breathing in mold is far worse than ingesting it. Mold can cause respiratory issues, sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, itchy or watery eyes, nose and throat, cough and postnasal drip, wheezing, rashes, and more.

What Can You Do?

indoor air quality testing gym

It never hurts to ask a question. Talk to your gym or fitness center management and find out if they’ve had an indoor air quality test. If they haven’t, request one. If you’re deciding which facility to patronize, choose one that has large open areas and windows that open. Oh, and while you’re at it, be sure your indoor air quality at home is acceptable as well, since you spend a majority of your time there.

RTK provides fast and unbiased mold and indoor air quality testing. To schedule a test or learn more, call 800.392.6468 or click here.

References

[1] https://cires.colorado.edu/news/sweat-bleach-gym-air-quality

[2] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0360132314002856

[3] http://www.epa.gov/airnow/2014conference/Plenary/Monday/Boehmer_NAQC_2014_final2.pdf

[4] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25712593

[5] http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM200012143432401#t=abstract

[6] http://ibe.sagepub.com/content/12/6/427.full.pdf+html