Winterize your home mold ice

With autumn in full swing, take advantage of the crisp days and sunshine to prepare your home for winter. Whether you do it yourself or hire a professional, complete these tasks and you won’t spend a fortune on home repairs this winter.

gutters moldClean your gutters.

It’s a hassle, but clean your gutters before the temperature drops to help prevent ice dams, which form when melted snow pools and refreezes at roof edges and eaves. This ridge of ice then Ice Dam Roofprevents water caused by melting snow from draining from the roof. Since it has nowhere to go, the water can leak into your home and damage walls, ceilings, and insulation. Water damage will soon be followed by mold. No matter what the season, gutters filled with heavy leaves can pull away from your house and cause leaks that damage your home and lead to mold growth.

roof leak moldCheck your roof for leaks.

You certainly don’t want to start your winter with a leaky roof. Check your ceilings for water spots, mold, or stains. If you spot them, before you call in a roofer, have a mold inspector test your Leak Mold Ceilinghome for mold. That way you’ll know exactly what needs to be replaced so the mold doesn’t come back. This is especially important if you live in New York, New Jersey, or Connecticut, which were heavily affected by Hurricane Sandy. You may have small stains or dark spots now, but once the heavy snow sets in, the problem could get much worse.

Clean your fireplace, furnace, and wood-burning stove.Wood Stove

Indoor air quality suffers in the winter because your home is closed up most of the time. Toxic fumes, including carbon monoxide and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), can be emitted from fireplace and wood burning stove smoke and may Family Fireplaceback up into the house, which can cause serious health issues. To make sure your indoor air quality is at an acceptable level; schedule a test from an environmental inspector like RTK Environmental Group. They will test for VOCs, mold, particulate matter, and other chemicals. For additional tips on indoor air quality, visit the Environmental Protection Agency’s Web site.